Netflix-Setting a good example


I love my Netflix. I admit it.

I only need to drop the movie in my mailbox and never have to worry about late fees and no trips to the video store.  I have 475 movies in my DVD queue and 196 in my instant queue, with some overlap between the groups. I recently found out that you can only have 500 movies maximum in your DVD queue, so I deleted a bunch of 2 star rated movies which should keep me under the limit for a while.

Netflix recently raised the price of my plan by $1 to $10 but I’m still happy.  In January I received 7 DVDs in January and watched 4 instant movies so I got my money’s worth. In December my 12 year old watched 12 episodes of 21 Jump Street over 2 days so I got my money’s worth.  We time our movies so one comes mid-week and one comes on the weekend.

I’m paying about the same amount for my 1-DVD out at a time plan as when I first joined, but I’m getting more out of my account with all of the features Netflix has added over the years.  I first became a subscriber in October of 2005. I tried it out but couldn’t find the time to watch movies with young kids.  A few years later I was back and haven’t given up on the service since. My opinion of Netflix has only gotten better over the years.

What has Netflix done to impress me?

  • I was able to create different queues, one for the kids and one for the adults, when we were getting 2 movies at a time.  When the “Adult” dvd was returned we’d get the next movie in the adult queue. This worked really well until we decided we just didn’t have the time to watch so many movies and cut back to the 1 DVD plan.
  • Adding the ability to easily watch instant movies on Xbox 360 and Wii.  Prior to that capability, I had no desire to sit in front a 15 inch monitor to watch a movie, so never took advantage of the instant movie capability.  Since the Xbox and Wii are already connected to a TV setup was a breeze.  Initially, watching instant movies on the Wii required you to insert a special disc but eventually Netflix worked things out so it was just as easy to watch instant movies on the Wii as it is the 360.  In our house, these devices are connected to different TVs, so we have 2 places to watch instant movies easily.  I got a $6, 6-foot HDMI cable from Harbor Freight that lets me hook my laptop to a TV so when I”m at my parent’s house I can watch instant movies at their house too.  So many options.
  • Improving delivery times so I’m practically guaranteed to get a new movie within 2 days of sending one back. I stick my movie in the mailbox on Monday, they mark it received on Tuesday and my new movie arrives on Wednesday.  Sweet.  When I first joined Netflix their delivery times were no where near this mark, it might take 3-5 days to get the next movie, meaning I’d only be able to watch 5 movies a month.  This is also one of the reasons I dropped the service the first time.  It helps that Rochester is one of the hubs locally.
  • One of the most unexpected but much appreciated demonstrations of good service happened last year when a Hello Kitty movie for my daughter was unavailable locally, so Netflix sent the next DVD in my queue while working on getting me the Hello Kitty movie a few days later.  I now had 2 movies out at a time without having to pay for two.  It’s happened a handful of times since and always makes appreciate the good customer service that Netflix offers.  They didn’t need to send me another movie while I waited, but have made a conscious decision to improve the customer experience.
  • Integrating Common Sense ratings in the movie descriptions which help me make informed decisions on whether to let my kids watch certain movies.  It’s helpful to understand specifically why a movie is rated PG-13 or R.
  • Continuing to add movies to be watched instantly.  As mentioned above, I have no problem finding a movie to watch when I have the time but don’t have the  inclination to run to the local Redbox for a movie.

I have lots of reasons for sticking with Netflix, not the least of which is their great customer service.

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6 thoughts on “Netflix-Setting a good example

  1. I’ve been using Netflix since 2004 and have been 95% happy with the service.

    If one really wants to get the more out of their Netflix usage, PC World just published an article, “10 Netflix Power Tools: Optimize Your Viewing Experience”.
    http://bit.ly/fnAdl5

    The first tool, FeedFlix, is great. If you are not sure you are getting your money’s worth from Netflix, it clearly tells you the cost/movie (combine disc and Instant Watch), time you keep a disc, and cost/disc. Unfortunately, it does not properly support aggregated analysis of multiple queues.

    The other favorite of mine is DVDLater, which makes it dead simple for you add both “currently showing” and “coming soon” movies to your queue. For example, you can add “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides”, “Hall Pass”, “The Roomate”, and “Hop” today.

    • Thanks Rick. I sometimes consider dropping Netflix with the thought that when I want to rent a movie I can always get something from RedBox. The problem is that RedBox has a very limited selection and we like to get unusual and older movies that definitely wouldn’t be found in one of those. I really love the selection of movies Netflix carries, both in DVD format and instantly.

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